Impact of the Coronavirus pandemic will be deeper than visible : Anjum Chopra

Recent times have been difficult for humanity. The unprecedented spread of novel coronavirus has uprooted the routines of modern lives. In South Asia, the spread has been limited but the economic effects are far-reaching. The cricketing economy has taken a hit. Cricket Australia has left a large chunk of its workforce.

To understand the impact of COVID19 on cricket, Anjum Chopra has shared her perspective. She has been one of India’s premier commentators and more than a voice on the telecasts, she has been one of the brightest cricketing stars to shine from the galaxy of women’s cricket. In a comment in relation to the impact of the pandemic, she feels that aftermaths will be deeper than visible and the normal course of action will take efforts in a gradual manner.

 

Anjum Chopra - Female Cricketer
Anjum Chopra – former Captain of Indian Women’s Cricket Team. Pic Credits: PTI

 

She adds that not only on cricket, the Indian nation, and the world will be affected in a manner beyond our thinking. She was talking to IANSlife over the telephone where she shared her concern. She highlighted that the game has reached new heights and women’s cricket has seen a rise in popularity. Having started playing cricket at the age of 9, she has seen cricket for a while. She made her one day debut in 1995. She says that “Whenever we have assessed the growth, I think it’s always been on the upscale and upswing. Ever since then, I’ve been associated with the game, which has nearly been three decades, the game has always been improving, never been on a downslide. The awareness levels of the women’s game have most definitely risen. There is a marked improvement and it’s not only my belief.

The numbers that ICC has released – in terms of the number of impressions that they received, people watching the world cup final online, or on television – show it has been on an upswing. The numbers of 2020 Women’s World Cup held in Australia were much higher than the last T20 World Cup in West Indies in 2018.”

She remembers getting a lac for one tour when she was in the Indian side but now contracts have gone up to 50 lacs. Women’s cricket is growing with time. The consistent performance and the struggle has brought women’s cricket to a new threshold. She happily reveals that being an Indian cricketer, half the work is done as cricket is viral in the subcontinent, and Indians often term this a religion.

Also Read:  Australian women to do some 'tinkering' ahead of Sri Lanka series says coach Matthew Mott

 

Indian vs Bangladesh Women's Cricket team
Indian vs Bangladesh Women’s Cricket team. Pic Credits: ICC

 

On the lockdown, she is locked in Delhi. She concluded that “Doing my regular exercises, and something new as well. I’ve shifted over to more yoga and less running but mixing them up. I’m also contributing to the daily chores since we have limited staff. Getting everything done, getting groceries takes half the day and the other half I have my own office work and pending jobs that couldn’t happen since I was traveling for work. I’m catching up on all that”.

She has been the face of Indian women’s cricket from the early days. Being awarded the Arjuna award and Padma Shri, she has been inspiration for youngsters and many players that we see on the field nowadays.

News Source: Outlook India

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