Lord’s prepares to celebrate the 25th Anniversary of Women’s Ashes

Former England captain Clare Connor expressed her delight as Lord’s Cricket Ground prepares to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the creation of the Women’s Ashes trophy.

Lords Cricket Ground. PC: Getty Images
Lords Cricket Ground. PC: Getty Images

 

Connor described the event as “like a fairytale,” reflecting on her memories of the ceremony held in 1998. At age 21, Connor was deeply involved in the occasion, which involved burning bats signed by players from England and Australia, alongside a copy of the Women’s Cricket Association rulebook. The unique ceremony took place in the Harris Garden at Lord’s, with a makeshift set of bricks raised off the ground and a wok borrowed from the MCC kitchen to facilitate the burning. The resulting ashes were collected and placed in a small cricket ball trophy.

The Women’s Ashes trophy remained intact until 2013, when the multi-format Ashes series was introduced. Although the original trophy was replaced, the ball from the inaugural ceremony remains encased within the new award. Lord’s Cricket Ground will host a celebration on Saturday to honor the 25th anniversary of the Women’s Ashes creation, coinciding with England’s final T20 match against Australia. Distinguished guests, including participants from the original ceremony, will be present for the unveiling of a plaque by MCC President Stephen Fry in the Harris Garden.

England’s recent thrilling three-run victory at The Oval ensured that the Women’s Ashes series remains alive, although they currently trail Australia 6-2. With three One-Day International (ODI) matches remaining, England must win all of them to reclaim the trophy. Reflecting on the upcoming celebration, Clare Connor, who won the Ashes in 2005, expressed her hope that the crowd on Saturday would experience the same excitement and inspiration witnessed during the matches at Edgbaston and The Oval earlier in the week.

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Connor emphasized the significance of the Women’s Ashes and highlighted the progress made by women’s cricket over the past 25 years. She recalled the symbolic nature of creating the trophy and the burning ceremony, which involved the players inscribing their names into the history of women’s cricket. Drawing a stark contrast between the humble beginnings of the Women’s Ashes in 1998 and the present, Connor emphasized the substantial evolution of the sport.

The match on Saturday, held in partnership with the MCC Foundation, pays tribute to the foundation’s ongoing efforts to promote women’s and girls’ cricket. The MCC Foundation is actively involved in cricket projects that reach thousands of individuals each year.

Source: Independent

Sports have always been a huge part of my life, and having played cricket professionally for my state team, I gained a deeper understanding of what it takes to succeed in the world of sports. With an eye for detail and passion for sports, I’m hoping to make a lasting impact in the sports industry.

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