How Leading Cricket Nations are Shaping Up Ahead of 2022 Women’s World Cup?

All but one of the 11 previous editions of the ICC Women’s World Cup have gone to Ashes rivals England or Australia. It’s no surprise to find their ladies’ teams top of the ODI rankings considering that.

 

This photo by Unknown Author is licensed under CC BY-SA
This photo by Unknown Author is licensed under CC BY-SA

 

Australia has dominated limited-overs women’s cricket. To go with their six World Cup wins in the 50 overs format, they have also captured five of the last six T20 World Cups.

The way that cricket is taken so seriously Down Under definitely plays its part in such sustained success. Women’s domestic leagues for both One-Day and T20 disciplines operating in Australia have produced some top players.

Thanks to the annual Women’s Big Bash and National Cricket League, these have helped the nation reach and then remain at the top of the sport. It’s not Australia, but England who are the World Cup holders, however.

 

India, who performed so poorly when previously hosting the tournament in 2013, went all the way to the final four years later, knocking the Aussies out en route. England triumphed on home soil, however, and stay just ahead of the Subcontinent superpower in the ODI rankings despite the growth of the Women’s IPL.

Speaking of rankings, England’s opening batswoman and wicketkeeper Tammy Beaumont is now statistically best in the world in this form of the game. Total combined runs of 231 from a recent series win in New Zealand elevated her to top spot.

The holders have more firepower than just Beaumont as they gear up for a World Cup defence, however. England skipper Heather Knight has always been more than handy at the crease.

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Supplementing the holders’ exploits with the bat is a varied and potent bowling attack. Allrounder Nat Sciver can contribute in both areas, drawing comparisons with England men’s counterpart Ben Stokes.


On top of that, pace bowler Katherine Brunt looks as good as ever and there is a promising crop of spinners who are still to reach their full potential. Sarah Glenn and Sophie Ecclestone are only in their early 20s, but both already taking wickets at the international level.

When you consider the strength-in-depth available to England, don’t be surprised if they are prominent in the cricket betting to retain the World Cup in New Zealand next year. The hosts, who lifted the trophy when last given such duties back in 2000, aren’t even the best of the rest behind the women’s cricket big three.

South Africa, who have never done better than the semi-finals at past editions of this tournament, are fourth-best in the rankings. With New Zealand suffering a home series defeat to England, they will have to raise their game during the Southern Hemisphere’s autumn in 2022 Australia are the most likely favorites, given how stiff the competition is to get into the XI, but as 2017 showed they can be beaten. Regaining the World Cup in their part of the world in their neighbors’ own backyard will doubtless serve as powerful motivation.

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