List of 7 ODI World Cup Titles for Australian Women’s Cricket Team

On April 3, 2022, Australia won their seventh World Cup title as they beat the defending champions England by 71 runs. Let’s take a look at all the seven wins of Australia in the World Cups.

1978 in India (50 overs per side)

 

Australian Women's Cricket Team winning 1978 World Cup Title. PC: AusWomenCricket / Twitter
Australian Women’s Cricket Team winning 1978 World Cup Title. PC: AusWomenCricket / Twitter

 

On January 13, Australia beat England by eight wickets at Lal Bahadur Shastri Stadium in Hyderabad in front of a crowd in excess of 40,000. Australia chased down the paltry target of 97 in 31.3 overs to win their first World Cup title. Margaret Jennings led the run chase from the front with an undefeated 57. While with the ball it was Sharon Tredrea, who was the wrecker-in-chief for Australia, picking up 4-25 in 10 overs.

1982 in New Zealand (60 overs per side)

Australian Women's Cricket Team winning 1982 World Cup Title. PC: AusWomenCricket / Twitter
Australian Women’s Cricket Team winning 1982 World Cup Title. PC: AusWomenCricket / Twitter

 

On February 7, Australia beat England by three wickets to win their second World Cup title. Winning the toss and electing to bat first at Lancaster Park in Christchurch, England posted 5-151 in 60 overs, thanks to Jan Southgate’s 53 off 104 balls. Lyn Fullston was the pick of the bowlers for Australia as she scalped 2-20 in 12 overs. The match went all the way down the wire as Australia chased down the target in 59 overs. Jen Jacobs top scored for Australia with 37 runs from 45 balls, while for England, Avril Starling starred with the ball as she picked up 2-21 in 12 overs.

1988 in Australia (60 overs per side)

Australian Women's Cricket Team winning 1988 World Cup Title. PC: AusWomenCricket / Twitter
Australian Women’s Cricket Team winning 1988 World Cup Title. PC: AusWomenCricket / Twitter

 

On December 18, Australia beat England by eight wickets to win their third World Cup title. England were restricted to a modest score of 7-127 in 60 overs at the Melbourne Cricket Ground by Australia and in reply, the hosts chased down the target in 44.5 overs. Lindsay Reeler top scored with an unbeaten 59 off 147 balls to steer her side home. 

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1997 in India (50 overs per side since then)

Australian Women's Cricket Team winning 1997 World Cup Title. PC: AusWomenCricket / Twitter
Australian Women’s Cricket Team winning 1997 World Cup Title. PC: AusWomenCricket / Twitter

 

On December 29, Australia beat New Zealand by five wickets to win their fourth World Cup title. Batting first at Eden Gardens in Kolkata, New Zealand’s innings was done and dusted for a humble 164 in 49.3 overs, thanks to a combined bowling effort from Australia. In reply, Australia made light work of the chase as they completed the formalities in 47.4 overs. Captain Belinda Clark led the run chase from the front with a brilliant half-century.

2005 in South Africa

Australian Women's Cricket Team winning 2005 World Cup Title. PC: AusWomenCricket / Twitter
Australian Women’s Cricket Team winning 2005 World Cup Title. PC: AusWomenCricket / Twitter

 

On April 10, Australia beat India by 98 runs to win their fifth World Cup title. Batting first at Centurion, Australia put together a respectable score of 4-215 in 50 overs, riding on Karen Rolton’s delectable century. India, playing their first ever finals in the World Cup, crumbled under pressure as they were bowled out for a paltry 117 in 46 overs. India’s batting was made to look listless by Australia’s lethal bowling attack. Cathryn Fitzpatrick, who was considered as the fastest bowler of that generation accounted for 2-23 in eight overs with Shelley Nitschke chipping in with 2-14 in nine overs.

2013 in India

Australian Women's Cricket Team winning 2013 World Cup Title. PC: AusWomenCricket / Twitter
Australian Women’s Cricket Team winning 2013 World Cup Title. PC: AusWomenCricket / Twitter

 

On February 17, Australia beat West Indies by 114 runs to win their sixth World Cup title. Batting first at Brabourne in Mumbai, Australia posted a competitive score of 7-259 in 50 overs. Rachael Haynes and Jess Duffin were the twin half-centurions for Australia. On the other hand, for West Indies, it was Shaquana Quintyne, who was the pick of the bowlers as she scalped 3-27 in 10 overs. Chasing 260, West Indies were bundled out for a modest 145 in 43.1 overs, thanks to Ellyse Perry, who wreaked havoc with the ball picking up 3-19 in 10 overs. The West Indian batting collapsed like a pack of cards as there was no substantial fight put up by any of the batters.

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2022 in New Zealand

Australian Women's Cricket Team winning 2022 World Cup Title. PC: AusWomenCricket / Twitter
Australian Women’s Cricket Team winning 2022 World Cup Title. PC: AusWomenCricket / Twitter

 

On April 3, Australia beat England by 71 runs to win their seventh World Cup title. Batting first at the Hagley Oval in Christchurch, Australia piled up 5-356 in 50 overs, riding on Alyssa Healy’s brilliant knock of 170 runs from 138 balls. England, the defending champions, on the other hand had an off day with the ball as they had no answers to the questions posed by the Australian batters. In reply, Heather Knight and co. scored 285 in 43.4 overs as they were bowled out by a potent Australian bowling attack. Natalie Sciver was the lone warrior in the fight as she muscled an unbeaten 148 off 121 balls. Her century went in vain as England failed to cross the line. Healy won the player of the match for the finals and player of the tournament.

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I am a former cricketer having represented Mumbai University at All India University level. I was a part of MCA probables for the U-19 and U-23 age group. I have been an avid cricket writer for the last five years. Currently I am pursuing my Ph.D from IIT Bombay.

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